09 Sep AcceliBEAT Weekly Round Up 9/5-9/9: UN Panel Calls for Inclusive Education

September 9, 2016

accelibeat - special ed
This week, inclusive education took the international stage as the UN named it as a basic right for students with disabilities across the world. But a new study raises concerns about the potential downside of inclusion, particularly upon students without disabilities. Meanwhile, with the new school year now underway, schools are beginning to take a closer look at mental health and how it affects student learning and are also developing plans to address one of the school system’s biggest problems: absenteeism. This news and more in this week’s AcceliBEAT!

Flags outside the UNUN Panel Calls for Inclusive Education
Being educated in an inclusive environment is a basic right for students with disabilities, according to a new set of guidelines from the United Nations.

 

 

Illustration of a nurse examining a wolfSchool Nurses Can Be Mental Health ‘Detectives’ But They Need Help
School nurses play a critical role in identifying students with mental health disorders, but there aren’t enough of them and they often don’t have enough training.

 

 

Teacher Sitting at a School Desk Showing a Book to a Parent and Her Son5 Tips for Effective Communication Between Home and School
Strong communication between home and school is key to student success. When parents become involved in school, research shows that children are more likely to engage in positive behavior, to be more motivated to learn, to have more regular attendance, and to possess a more positive attitude about school all around.

 

 

Teenagers standing outside of a school buildingA New Program Will Give 100 New York City Schools Extra Mental Health Training
The conversation about infusing New York City schools with mental health services often centers around “community school” programs that pour extra funding into low-performing schools and provide social workers or health clinics.

 

 

empty classroomAmerican Schools Have a Chronic Absentee Problem
If showing up is half the battle, a lot of American schoolchildren are in trouble.

 

 

books stacked against a chalkboard with an apple on top The Long-Term Consequences of Missing School
Six million children are chronically absent, half of whom are enrolled at just 5 percent of the nation’s school districts.

 

 

"teachers wanted" written on a chalkboardOur Opinion: Teacher Shortage Hits Special Education Particularly Hard
Maine is one of 49 states with a problem, and it will take a culture of change to solve it.

 

 

better goals for better outcomesUpcoming Webinar: Better Goals for Better Outcomes
Join our upcoming webinar to learn best-practices for writing effective, measurable goals that improve outcomes for students.

 

 

students working in an inclusion classroomStudies Flag Potential Downside to Inclusion
One of the foundations of federal special education law is that students with disabilities should be educated “to the maximum extent appropriate” with their peers who do not have disabilities

 

 


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