11 Nov AcceliBEAT Weekly Round Up 11/7-11/11: Autism Drug Trial Underway

November 11, 2016

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This week we share with you news about a groundbreaking drug in clinical trials that could yield symptomatic improvements in the treatment of children with autism.  In New York City, the struggle continues to manage special education compliance data.  In other news, disability portrayals on TV are at a record high and Toys R Us plans to test special needs accommodations in its stores this holiday season. All this and more in this week’s AcceliBEAT!

Autistic child holding blue puzzle pieceAutism Drug Trial Underway
Researchers are hopeful that a new clinical drug trial based on research linking diet and brain development could yield a treatment that addresses core symptoms of autism.

 

 

 

Disabled Micah Fowler from ABC's "Speechless." Disability Portrayals on TV at Record High
The number of characters with disabilities on prime-time television is on the rise, with a new report finding such representation nearly doubled since last year.

 

 

 

Webinar - Transition PlanningTransition Planning: How to Avoid the “Black-Hole” Between Graduation and Adulthood
Join the webinar, featuring special guest Jennifer Kaut, M.Ed., BCBA, State Autism and Developmental Disorders Specialist for the Texas Workforce Solutions, Rehabilitation Services Division.

 

 

 

 

students in classroom sitting

City’s Special Ed Compliance Still Hobbled by Bad Data
New York City officials said they are still struggling with the way they collect information on special education programs in public schools.

 

 

 

Retailer Toys "R" Us is offering "quiet" shopping hours aimed at families of kids with special needs at some stores and could expand the offering nationally. (Shutterstock)

Toys R Us Testing Special Needs Accommodations
The region’s individualist ethos and unique demographic breakdown have resulted in a lack of early-education investment.

 

 

 

Kids racing with wheelchair inclusion

Yonkers, N.Y., District Commits to More Inclusion

27,000-student district has committed to placing more students with disabilities in general education classrooms, after a federal investigation showed the district was shifting students into restrictive settings with no individualized rationale.

 

 

 

 


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